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  • Kamenets-Podolsk
  • Karl Dönitz

    Article

    In the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, the world was faced with a challenge—how to hold individually accountable those German leaders who were responsible for the commission of monstrous crimes against humanity and international peace. The International Military Tribunal (IMT) held in Nuremberg, Germany, attempted to face this immense challenge. On October 18, 1945, the chief prosecutors of the IMT brought charges against 24 leading German officials, among them Karl Dönitz.

    Karl Dönitz
  • Karl Kautsky

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Karl Kautsky.

    Karl Kautsky
  • Karl Marx

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Karl Marx.

    Karl Marx
  • Karolina Dresler

    Article

    The Jewish children of Lodz suffered unfolding harsh realities after the German invasion of Poland. Some of the children, among them Karolina Dresler, recorded their experiences in diaries. Their voices offer a view into the struggle of a community and its young to live in spite of the most difficult circumstances.

     

    Karolina Dresler
  • Katzenberger Case, March 13, 1942

    Article

    The Decision of the Nuremberg Special Court in the Katzenberger Race Defilement Case reveals a series of inconsistencies and perversions allowed under the Nazi system of justice. The verdict was written to meet a predetermined outcome of guilt. It was a public demonstration designed to inflame antisemitic feeling and justify the extraordinary measures put in place to persecute Jews and other so-called enemies of the regime.

  • Kaufering

    Article

    Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its allies established more than 44,000 camps and other incarceration sites (including ghettos). The perpetrators used these locations for a range of purposes, including forced labor, detention of people deemed to be "enemies of the state," and mass murder. Millions of people suffered and died or were killed. Among these sites was Kaufering. 

    Kaufering
  • Mass Shootings at Babyn Yar (Babi Yar)

    Article

    In late September 1941, SS and German police units and their auxiliaries perpetrated one of the largest massacres of World War II. It took place at a ravine called Babyn Yar (Babi Yar) just outside the Ukrainian capital city of Kyiv.

    Tags: Kiev
    Mass Shootings at Babyn Yar (Babi Yar)
  • Killing Center Revolts
  • Killing Centers: An Overview

    Article

    The Nazis established killing centers in German-occupied Europe during World War II. They built these killing centers exclusively or primarily for the mass murder of human beings. Nazi officials employed assembly-line methods of murder in these facilities.

    Killing Centers: An Overview
  • Killing Centers: In Depth
  • Kindertransport, 1938–40

    Article

    Kindertransport (Children's Transport) was the informal name of a series of rescue efforts between 1938 and 1940. These rescue efforts brought thousands of refugee children, the vast majority of them Jewish, to Great Britain from Nazi Germany.

    Kindertransport, 1938–40
  • King Christian X of Denmark

    Article

    Did King Christian X of Denmark wear a yellow star in support of the Danish Jews? Read more about the historical truth behind the legend.

  • Klaus Barbie: The Butcher of Lyon

    Article

    Nikolaus "Klaus" Barbie was the chief of the Gestapo in Lyon, France, a vital center of the French Resistance, during World War II. He was responsible for the execution or murder of over 4,000 individuals and for the deportation of 7,500 Jews, the majority of whom perished in Auschwitz. After the war, Barbie worked for American intelligence services before escaping to South America. He was extradited to France in 1983 to stand trial for war crimes.

    Tags: perpetrators
  • Klaus Mann

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Klaus Mann.

  • Kloster Indersdorf Displaced Persons Camp

    Article

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Kloster Indersdorf. 

    Kloster Indersdorf Displaced Persons Camp
  • Konstantin von Neurath

    Article

    In the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, the world was faced with a challenge—how to hold individually accountable those German leaders who were responsible for the commission of monstrous crimes against humanity and international peace. The International Military Tribunal (IMT) held in Nuremberg, Germany, attempted to face this immense challenge. On October 18, 1945, the chief prosecutors of the IMT brought charges against 24 leading German officials, among them Konstantin von Neurath.

    Konstantin von Neurath
  • Kovno

    Article

    During the Holocaust, the creation of ghettos was a key step in the Nazi process of marginalizing, persecuting, and ultimately destroying Europe's Jews. Ghettos separated Jews from the non-Jewish population and concentrated them for later deportation and mass murder. Living conditions for the imprisoned Jewish communities were appalling. One of the most well-known ghettos in the German-occupied east was the Kovno ghetto.

    Kovno
  • Krakow Ghetto: Key Dates
  • Kristallnacht

    Article

    On November 9–10, 1938, Nazi leaders unleashed a series of pogroms against the Jewish population in Germany and recently incorporated territories. This event came to be called Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass) because of the shattered glass that littered the streets after the vandalism and destruction of Jewish-owned businesses, synagogues, and homes. 

    Kristallnacht
  • Kurt Gerstein

    Article

    German SS officer Kurt Gerstein was assigned to the Hygiene Institute of the Waffen SS. He was called upon to assist in the implementation of the "Final Solution." After witnessing atrocities at the Belzec and Treblinka killing centers, he tried to inform foreign diplomats, Vatican officials, and members of the political resistance within Germany about Nazi German atrocities. While in Allied custody after the war, Gerstein wrote a report documenting the atrocities he had witnessed. 

  • Kurt Pinthus

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Kurt Pinthus.

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