<p>A transport of Jewish prisoners forced to march through the snow from the Bauschovitz train station to <a href="/narrative/5386">Theresienstadt</a>. Czechoslovakia, 1942.</p>

Artifact

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  • Suitcase belonging to a Polish Jewish refugee (exterior)

    Artifact

    A few Polish Jewish refugees left Japan to join a small Jewish community in Harbin, Manchuria, in Japanese-occupied China. One of them carried this suitcase, covered with stickers from various shipping firms and hotels, on the journey to Harbin. China, 1940-1941. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Suitcase belonging to a Polish Jewish refugee (exterior)
  • Suitcase belonging to a Polish-Jewish refugee

    Artifact

    A small group of Jewish refugees left Japan to join a small Jewish community in Harbin, Manchuria, in Japanese-occupied China. This image shows the interior of a leather suitcase carried by one of them to Harbin, China, 1940-1941. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Suitcase belonging to a Polish-Jewish refugee
  • Teddy bear carried by a child on a Kindertransport

    Artifact

    Teddy bear belonging to Jack Hellman as a child. He carried it with him when he left for England from Germany on a Kindertransport in early 1939.

    Teddy bear carried by a child on a Kindertransport
  • The Times, August 17, 1921

    Artifact

    In this London Times article, reporter Philip Graves compared passages from Maurice Joly’s Dialogue in Hell Between Machiavelli and Montesquieu (1864) side-by-side with the Protocols of the Elders of Zion in order to prove that the Protocols was plagiarized. Other investigations revealed that one chapter of a Prussian novel, Hermann Goedsche’s Biarritz (1868), also “inspired” the Protocols. Times (London), August 17, 1921.

    The Times, August 17, 1921
  • The Times, August 17, 1921

    Artifact

    In this London Times article, reporter Philip Graves compared passages from Maurice Joly’s Dialogue in Hell Between Machiavelli and Montesquieu (1864) side-by-side with the Protocols of the Elders of Zion in order to prove that the Protocols was plagiarized. Other investigations revealed that one chapter of a Prussian novel, Hermann Goedsche’s Biarritz (1868), also “inspired” the Protocols. Times (London), August 17, 1921.

    The Times, August 17, 1921
  • The Times, August 17, 1921

    Artifact

    In this London Times article, reporter Philip Graves compared passages from Maurice Joly’s Dialogue in Hell Between Machiavelli and Montesquieu (1864) side-by-side with the Protocols of the Elders of Zion in order to prove that the Protocols was plagiarized. Other investigations revealed that one chapter of a Prussian novel, Hermann Goedsche’s Biarritz (1868), also “inspired” the Protocols. Times (London), August 17, 1921.

    The Times, August 17, 1921
  • The Times, August 17, 1921

    Artifact

    In this London Times article, reporter Philip Graves compared passages from Maurice Joly’s Dialogue in Hell Between Machiavelli and Montesquieu (1864) side-by-side with the Protocols of the Elders of Zion in order to prove that the Protocols was plagiarized. Other investigations revealed that one chapter of a Prussian novel, Hermann Goedsche’s Biarritz (1868), also “inspired” the Protocols. Times (London), August 17, 1921.

    The Times, August 17, 1921
  • The Times, August 17, 1921

    Artifact

    In this London Times article, reporter Philip Graves compared passages from Maurice Joly’s Dialogue in Hell Between Machiavelli and Montesquieu (1864) side-by-side with the Protocols of the Elders of Zion in order to prove that the Protocols was plagiarized. Other investigations revealed that one chapter of a Prussian novel, Hermann Goedsche’s Biarritz (1868), also “inspired” the Protocols. Times (London), August 17, 1921.

    The Times, August 17, 1921
  • Three metal boxes used to hold content of the Oneg Shabbat archive

    Artifact

    Three of the ten metal boxes in which portions of the Oneg Shabbat archive were hidden and buried in the Warsaw ghetto. The boxes are currently in the possession of the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw. In this view the three boxes are stacked on top of one another. The box on top is displayed on its side without the lid.

    Three metal boxes used to hold content of the Oneg Shabbat archive
  • Tourist guide to Kobe, Japan (cover)

    Artifact

    The Kobe Municipal Office issued this English-language tourist guide to Kobe and its environs. Jewish refugees in Kobe used such pieces of information. Kobe, Japan, 1940-1941. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Tags: Japan refugees
    Tourist guide to Kobe, Japan (cover)
  • Tourist pamphlet about Kobe, Japan

    Artifact

    The Municipal Tourist Office in Kobe issued this folded English-language tourist guide to the city. One side shows photographs and descriptions of Kobe's historic and scenic sites and the other provides a tourist map of Kobe. Jewish refugees in Kobe used such pieces of information. Kobe, Japan, 1940-1941. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Tags: Japan refugees
    Tourist pamphlet about Kobe, Japan
  • Trans-Siberian Express brochure (cover)

    Artifact

    Front cover of a brochure from the Soviet travel agency Intourist, describing the amenities of the Trans-Siberian Express. Despite their anxieties, most of the Jewish refugees traveling on the train felt like tourists. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Trans-Siberian Express brochure (cover)
  • Travel Clock

    Artifact

    A seven-day gold traveling clock in a leather case, manufactured in France and originally made for a Russian nobleman. The panel in the leather case slides open to reveal the clock face. The clock was a Szepsenwol family heirloom. It was acquired by Chaya Szepsenwol's grandfather, who like her father, was a jeweler. The clock was among the family valuables that Rikla Szepsenwol was able to take out of Poland. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Tags: refugees
    Travel Clock
  • Unitarian Service Committee brochure

    Artifact

    Brochure published by the Unitarian Service Committee describing its relief mission in Nazi-occupied Europe.

    Unitarian Service Committee brochure
  • Valises by the railcar in the Museum's Permanent Exhibition

    Artifact

    Many different kinds of railway cars were used for deportations. They varied in size and weight. The railway car on display in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Permanent Exhibition is of just one type used. The dimensions of the railway car in the Museum's exhibition are as follows: Total length 31 feet 6 inches (9.6 meters); interior space for deportees 26 feet 2 inches (8 meters). Total height 14 feet (4.3 meters) from the bottom of the wheel to the highest point of the car; interior space…

    Valises by the railcar in the Museum's Permanent Exhibition
  • Visitor pass

    Artifact

    Pass for the visitors' gallery at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. Such passes were often shared among several people as they took turns observing the historic legal proceedings.

    Visitor pass
  • Washington Post article

    Artifact

    An August 6, 1972, Washington Post article about former concentration camp guard Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan, entitled "From a Dark Past, A Ghost the U.S. Won't Allow to Rest".

    Washington Post article
  • We Will Never Die, program cover, 1943

    Artifact

    The program cover for "We Will Never Die" featured Arthur Szyk’s "Tears of Rage" artwork. The cover's original dimensions are: 12 1/16" x 9 1/16" x 3/16.

    We Will Never Die, program cover, 1943
  • Wedding Dress

    Artifact

    This wedding dress was made from a parachute and worn by Lilly Lax for her wedding to Ludwig Friedman in a displaced persons camp. Ludwig had promised to find fabric for a white gown, and purchased an old parachute for this purpose. Lilly hired a seamstress to make the dress in exchange for her cigarette ration. Other brides in the Celle and Belsen displaced persons camps subsequently wore the dress. Lilly and Ludwig immigrated to the United States in 1948.

    Wedding Dress
  • "What shall be done with the war criminals?"

    Artifact

    Cover of booklet titled "What Shall Be Done with the War Criminals?" Published by the United States Armed Forces Institute, this was one of a series of 42 pamphlets created by the U.S. War Department under the series title "G.I. Roundtable." From 1943-1945, these pamphlets were created to "increase the effectiveness of the soldiers and officers and fighters during the war and as citizens after the war." Many of the pamphlets addressed the possibilities of a postwar world.

    "What shall be done with the war criminals?"
  • White armband with blue Star of David

    Artifact

    White armband with a Star of David embroidered in blue thread, worn by Dina Offman from 1939 until 1941 while in the ghetto in Stopnica, Poland.

    White armband with blue Star of David
  • White armband with blue Star of David

    Artifact

    White armband with a Star of David embroidered in blue thread, worn by Dina Offman from 1939 until 1941 while in the ghetto in Stopnica, Poland.

    White armband with blue Star of David
  • Woodblock print

    Artifact

    David Bloch, untitled woodblock print with watercolor, ca. 1945. Bloch, a German Jewish refugee, depicted typical shops in "Little Vienna," as Chusan Road in Hongkew became known. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Woodblock print
  • Wool Bedcover

    Artifact

    Following the Soviet occupation of Lithuania, the Lifszyc family began to search for ways to leave the country. David Lifszyc obtained a Curacao visa from the Dutch consulate. He also obtained an American visa because he was included on a list of distinguished rabbis submitted to the State Department by the Agudat Israel of America. After obtaining Soviet exit visas, the Lifszycs purchased tickets for Vladivostok on February 5, 1941. They started for Moscow, where they received Japanese transit visas. This…

    Wool Bedcover
  • Zionist poster

    Artifact

    Zionist poster produced by a Jewish organization in Shanghai commemorating the anniversary of Vladimir Jabotinsky's death, 1944.

    Zionist poster

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