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  • Czechoslovakia
  • Varian Fry

    Article

    Varian Fry (1907–1967) was an American journalist who helped anti-Nazi refugees escape from France between 1940 and 1941.

     

    Varian Fry
  • Aliyah Bet
  • Ona Simaite, Joop Westerweel, Irena Sendler

    Article

    The history of the Holocaust is more than indifference, destruction, and loss. It is also about survival, resistance, and courage. In the face of cruelty and danger, some people refused to be bystanders and acted, often paying with their lives. They affirmed life and honored humanity. Three such examples are highlighted below.

     

  • History of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    Article

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is America’s national institution for the documentation, study, and interpretation of Holocaust history, and serves as this country’s memorial to the millions of people murdered during the Holocaust. It opened in April 1993. 

    History of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
  • Oskar Schindler

    Article

    During World War II, businessman Oskar Schindler rescued more than 1,000 Jews from deportation to Auschwitz, Nazi Germany's largest camp complex.

    Oskar Schindler
  • The Art and Politics of Arthur Szyk

    Article

    Arthur Szyk became one of America's most prominent cartoonists and caricaturists during World War II. Throughout the 1940s, his images reached millions of people through exhibitions, magazines, and newspapers. Szyk prided himself on being a propagandist for the Allies. Szyk's images, especially after 1942, were aimed at mobilizing American public opinion in order to win popular and political support for Jewish rescue during the Holocaust. 

  • Jewish Community of Kalisz in the Interwar Years
  • Jewish Community of Munkacs: An Overview
  • Jewish Community Life in Munkacs
  • Book Burning

    Article

    Beginning on May 10, 1933, Nazi-dominated student groups carried out public burnings of books they claimed were “un-German.” The book burnings took place in 34 university towns and cities. Works of prominent Jewish, liberal, and leftist writers ended up in the bonfires. The book burnings stood as a powerful symbol of Nazi intolerance and censorship.

    Book Burning
  • Artist on the Blacklist: Ludwig Meidner

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the writings thrown onto to the flames were political texts, literature, and even art books by or about such noted figures as Ludwig Meidner.

    Artist on the Blacklist: Ludwig Meidner
  • Sephardi Jews during the Holocaust
  • Bertolt Brecht

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Bertolt Brecht. 

    Bertolt Brecht
  • Lion Feuchtwanger

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Lion Feuchtwanger. 

    Lion Feuchtwanger
  • Alfred Kerr

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Alfred Kerr. 

  • Helen Keller

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Helen Keller.

    Helen Keller
  • Fire Oaths

    Article

    During the burning of books under the Nazi regime on May 10, 1933, many works were thrown into the flames while statements known as "fire oaths" were read. These statements declared why, in the Nazi view, the works of certain authors were to be burned. 

    Fire Oaths
  • Ernest Hemingway

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Ernest Hemingway. 

    Ernest Hemingway
  • Karl Marx

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Karl Marx.

    Karl Marx
  • Life in Shadows: Hidden Children and the Holocaust

    Article

    When World War II ended in 1945, six million European Jews were dead, killed in the Holocaust. About 1.5 million of the victims were children. Some children survived, however, because they were hidden. With identities disguised, and often physically concealed from the outside world, these youngsters had faced constant fear, dilemmas, and danger.

    Life in Shadows: Hidden Children and the Holocaust
  • Plight of Jewish Children

    Article

    During the Holocaust, some children went into hiding to escape Nazi persecution. With identities disguised, and often physically concealed from the outside world, these youngsters faced constant fear, dilemmas, and danger. Theirs was a life in shadows, where a careless remark, a denunciation, or the murmurings of inquisitive neighbors could lead to discovery and death.

    Plight of Jewish Children
  • Hidden Children: Hardships

    Article

    During the Holocaust, some children went into hiding to escape Nazi persecution. With identities disguised, and often physically concealed from the outside world, these youngsters faced constant fear, dilemmas, and danger. Hidden children and their rescuers faced overwhelming challenges and hardships.

    Hidden Children: Hardships
  • Hidden Children: Quest for Family

    Article

    During the Holocaust, some children went into hiding to escape Nazi persecution. With identities disguised, and often physically concealed from the outside world, these youngsters faced constant fear, dilemmas, and danger. Following the war, many Jewish parents spent months or years searching for the children they had sent into hiding.

    Hidden Children: Quest for Family
  • Hidden Children: Daily Life

    Article

    During the Holocaust, some children went into hiding to escape Nazi persecution. With identities disguised, and often physically concealed from the outside world, these youngsters faced constant fear, dilemmas, and danger. Theirs was a life in shadows, where a careless remark, a denunciation, or the murmurings of inquisitive neighbors could lead to discovery and death.

    Hidden Children: Daily Life
  • Hidden Children: Expressions
  • The 1st Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 1st Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • The 2nd Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

  • The 4th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

  • The 4th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

    The 4th Armored Division during World War II
  • The 6th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

    The 6th Armored Division during World War II
  • The 14th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

    The 14th Armored Division during World War II
  • The 84th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 84th Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • The 86th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 86th Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • The 89th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

  • The 90th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

  • The 11th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

    The 11th Armored Division during World War II
  • The 26th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 26th Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • Gusen

    Article

    Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its allies established more than 44,000 camps and other incarceration sites (including ghettos). The perpetrators used these locations for a range of purposes, including forced labor, detention of people deemed to be "enemies of the state," and mass murder. Millions of people suffered and died or were killed. Among these sites was the Gusen camp. 

    Gusen
  • The 83rd Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 83rd Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • The 9th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 9th Armored Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

    The 9th Armored Division during World War II
  • The 10th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

  • The 95th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 95th Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • The 8th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 8th Armored Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • The 8th Infantry Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

    The 8th Infantry Division during World War II
  • The 20th Armored Division during World War II

    Article

    As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

  • The 101st Airborne Division during World War II

    Article

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History initiated a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 101st Airborne Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

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