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Displaying results 71-80 of 10 for "armenian genocide"

  • Leipheim Displaced Persons Camp
    Article

    Leipheim Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Leipheim. 

  • Article

    Poking Pine City Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Poking Pine City.

  • Rothschild Hospital Displaced Persons Camp
    Article

    Rothschild Hospital Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as the Rothschild Hospital. 

  • Ziegenhain Displaced Persons Camp
    Article

    Ziegenhain Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Ziegenhain.  

  • Wetzlar Displaced Persons Camp
    Article

    Wetzlar Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Wetzlar. 

  • Media Gallery

    Antisemitism (Abridged Article) - Photograph

    The word antisemitism means prejudice against or hatred of Jews. The Holocaust is history’s most extreme example of antisemitism.

    The Nazi Party spread antisemitic propaganda to help garner support for many anti-Jewish policies leading ultimately to genocide.

  • Media Gallery

    Antisemitism - Photograph

    The word antisemitism means prejudice against or hatred of Jews. The Holocaust is history’s most extreme example of antisemitism.

    The Nazi Party spread antisemitic propaganda to help garner support for many anti-Jewish policies that led ultimately to genocide. 

  • Elie Wiesel Timeline and World Events: 1928–1951
    Article
  • Nazi Propaganda
    Article

    Nazi Propaganda

    The Nazis effectively used propaganda to win the support of millions of Germans in a democracy and, later in a dictatorship, to facilitate persecution, war, and ultimately genocide. The stereotypes and images found in Nazi propaganda were not new, but were already familiar to their intended audience.

  • 1935: Key Dates
    Article

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