You searched for: kèo cá độ【0242.com】ty le bong da ca cuoc

kèo cá độ【0242.com】ty le bong da ca cuoc

| Displaying results 101-125 of 586 for "kèo cá độ【0242.com】ty le bong da ca cuoc" |

  • Footbridge that joined the two parts of the Lodz ghetto

    Photo

    The footbridge over Zgierska Street that joined the two parts of the Lodz ghetto. The street itself was not part of the ghetto. Lodz, Poland, ca. 1941.

    Tags: Lodz ghettos
    Footbridge that joined the two parts of the Lodz ghetto
  • Prisoners arriving at the Belzec killing center

    Photo

    A column of prisoners arrives at the Belzec killing center. Belzec, Poland, ca. 1942. In early 1940 the Germans set up a forced-labor camp for Jewish prisoners in Belzec. The inmates were forced to build fortifications and dig anti-tank ditches along the demarcation line between Germany and Soviet-occupied Poland. The camp was closed down at the end of 1940. The following year, in November 1941, construction began on the Belzec killing center.

    Prisoners arriving at the Belzec killing center
  • Chart of prisoner markings

    Photo

    A chart of prisoner markings used in German concentration camps. Dachau, Germany, ca. 1938-1942. Beginning in 1937–1938, the SS created a system of marking prisoners in concentration camps. Sewn onto uniforms, the color-coded badges identified the reason for an individual’s incarceration, with some variation among camps. The Nazis used this chart illustrating prisoner markings in the Dachau concentration camp.

    Chart of prisoner markings
  • Jews move into the Kovno ghetto

    Photo

    Jews forced into the Kovno ghetto move their belongings into the ghetto. In the center, a man is pulling a disassembled wardrobe. He was never able to put it together because of the crowded conditions in the ghetto. Clothes were often hung from nails in the wall instead. Lithuania, ca. 1941-1942.

    Jews move into the Kovno ghetto
  • Children in the Warsaw ghetto

    Photo

    In the Warsaw ghetto, Jewish children with bowls of soup. Warsaw, Poland, ca. 1940. During the Holocaust, the creation of ghettos was a key step in the Nazi process of brutally separating, persecuting, and ultimately destroying Europe's Jews. Ghettos were often enclosed districts that isolated Jews from the non-Jewish population and from other Jewish communities.

    Children in the Warsaw ghetto
  • Jewish refugee boys at a children's home in France

    Photo

    Jewish refugee boys at the Maison des Pupilles de la Nation children's home in Aspet. These children reached the home through the efforts of the Children's Aid Society (Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants; OSE) and the American Friends Service Committee. Aspet, France, ca. 1942.

    Jewish refugee boys at a children's home in France
  • A US soldier stands among the corpses of prisoners exhumed from a mass grave near Nammering

    Photo

    A US soldier stands among the corpses of prisoners exhumed from a mass grave in a ravine near Nammering. On April 19, 1945, a freight train with nearly 4,500 prisoners from Buchenwald pulled onto the railroad siding at Nammering. Hundreds of prisoners who had died on the train were buried in the mass grave along with the prisoners who were forced to carry the corpses to the ravine and were then shot. Germany, ca. May 6, 1945.

    A US soldier stands among the corpses of prisoners exhumed from a mass grave near Nammering
  • Wedding in prewar Kovno

    Photo

    Family and friends are gathered for a Jewish wedding celebration in Kovno. Among those pictured are Jona and Gita Wisgardisky (standing at the back on the right).   In the summer of 1941 soon after the German occupation of Lithuania, the Wisgardisky family was forced into the Kovno ghetto. During a roundup of children in the ghetto in 1942, Henia (Gita and Jona's daughter) was hidden in a secret room that her father built in a pantry in their apartment. Later she was smuggled out of the ghetto and…

    Wedding in prewar Kovno
  • SA members post anti-Jewish boycott signs

    Photo

    An SA member instructs others where to post anti-Jewish boycott signs on a commercial street in Germany. A German civilian wearing a Nazi armband holds a sheaf of anti-Jewish boycott signs, while SA members paste them on a Jewish-owned business. Most of the signs read, "Germans defend yourselves against Jewish atrocity propaganda/Buy only at German stores." Germany, ca. April 1, 1933.

    SA members post anti-Jewish boycott signs
  • Antisemitic propaganda in the United States

    Photo

    Antisemitic propaganda in the United States that presents President Franklin D. Roosevelt's declaration of a state of unlimited national emergency as the product of an international Jewish conspiracy to save world Jewry and to bring destruction upon America. United States, ca. 1938–41. Among the antisemitic declarations on the caricature are: "Jews Are The Cause of  High Taxes - Slavery - Starvation and Death ---" "How long will the American people continue to tolerate this…

    Antisemitic propaganda in the United States
  • Portrait of three-year-old Estera Horn

    Photo

    Portrait of three-year-old Estera Horn wrapped in a fur coat. Chelm, Poland, ca. 1940. Estera was born in January 1937. Her father was killed soon after the Germans invaded Poland. Estera and her mother, Perla Horn, were forced into the ghetto in Chelm. At the end of 1942, during the liquidation of the ghetto, Perla and Estera escaped from the ghetto. They hid in nearby villages. In late 1943, Perla asked a family in Plawnice to take care of Estera. Perla tried to hide with a group of Jews in the nearby…

    Portrait of three-year-old Estera Horn
  • German children read an anti-Jewish propaganda book titled Der Giftpilz

    Photo

    German children read an anti-Jewish propaganda book for children titled Der Giftpilz (The Poisonous Mushroom). The girl on the left holds a companion volume, the translated title of which is "Trust No Fox." Germany, ca. 1938. (Source record ID: E39 Nr .2381/5)

    German children read an anti-Jewish propaganda book titled Der Giftpilz
  • A gay couple in Berlin

    Photo

    Portrait of a gay couple. Berlin, Germany, ca. 1930. Nazi ideology identified a multitude of enemies and led to the systematic persecution and murder of many millions of people, both Jews and non-Jews. The Nazis posed as moral crusaders who wanted to stamp out the "vice" of homosexuality from Germany in order to help win the racial struggle. Once they took power in 1933, the Nazis intensified persecution of German male homosexuals. 

    A gay couple in Berlin
  • The Kusserow family

    Photo

    The Kusserow family was active in their region distributing religious literature and teaching Bible study classes in their home. They were Jehovah's Witnesses. Their house was conveniently situated for fellow Jehovah's Witnesses along the tram route connecting the cities of Paderborn and Detmold. For the first three years after the Nazis came to power, the Kusserows endured moderate persecution by local Gestapo agents, who often came to search their home for religious materials. In 1936, Nazi police…

    The Kusserow family
  • Nazi eugenics poster

    Photo

    Nazi eugenics poster entitled "Feeble-mindedness in related families in four neighboring towns." This poster shows how "feeble-mindedness" and alcoholism are passed down from one couple to their four children and their families. The poster was part of a series entitled, "Erblehre und Rassenkunde" (Theory of Inheritance and Racial Hygiene), published by the Verlag für nationale Literatur (Publisher for National Literature), Stuttgart, Germany, ca. 1935.

    Tags: eugenics
    Nazi eugenics poster
  • Joseph Roger Cheraki

    Photo

    Joseph Roger Cheraki poses in the uniform of an Algerian soldier, ca. 1935. Joseph met Elizabeth Seiberl, and they married on October 27, 1936, in Algiers. In 1941, Joseph lost his job, their son Alfred was expelled from school, and they later had to sell their house. In 1942 Joseph, Elizabeth, and their sons Alfred and Jacques had to wear the yellow star. Boys threw stones at Alfred and Jacques. Joseph was sent to a forced-labor camp for a few months. He was eventually released. In 1946 the family…

    Joseph Roger Cheraki
  • Poster for Nazi Party speech on Jewish Bolshevik threat

    Photo

    Poster for a meeting and speech about the Jewish Bolshevik threat against Germany sponsored by the local Nazi Party of East Hannover. Depicted is a silhouetted caricature of a Jewish man’s head in left profile, with a large, red Star of David beside him. The announcement at the top of the poster reads: "Victory over Bolshevism and plutocracy means being freed from the Jewish parasite!" Created ca. 1937–1940.   

    Poster for Nazi Party speech on Jewish Bolshevik threat
  • Destruction in Warsaw

    Photo

    Following the German invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939, Warsaw suffered heavy air attacks and artillery bombardment. German troops entered the city on September 29, shortly after its surrender. This photograph was taken by Julien Bryan, an American documentary filmmaker who captured the German bombardment and its impact on the Polish citizenry. Warsaw, Poland, ca. 1939.

    Destruction in Warsaw
  • Father Wlodarczyk tries to clean a bombed-out church

    Photo

    Father Wlodarczyk attempts to clean and repair a bombed-out church in the besieged city of Warsaw. Photographed by Julien Bryan, Warsaw, Poland, ca. 1939.

    Father Wlodarczyk tries to clean a bombed-out church
  • Prewar portrait of Basia and Moshe Golden

    Photo

    A prewar photograph of Basia and Moshe Golden (Gordon) taken ca. 1922–1925 in Swieciany, Poland (now Lithuania). Basia, along with two of their four children, Boruch and Teyva, were shot at the Ponary killing site by SS men and their Lithuanian collaborators in September 1943. Moshe died in the Klooga concentration camp. Two of their children survived, Niusia and Rwya. This photograph was saved by Niusia (now Anna Nodel) while she was in hiding.

    Prewar portrait of Basia and Moshe Golden
  • First day of school

    Photo

    Two Jewish girls (cousins Margot and Lotte Cassel) ready for their first day of school in Breslau, Germany, ca. 1937. As was traditional for all children in Germany, the cones were filled with treats to celebrate their first day of school. Margot's father, Saul, worked in the Tietz department store until he was dismissed following the enactment of the Nuremberg Laws.

    First day of school
  • Thomas Buergenthal with the soldier who realized that Thomas was Jewish and took him to an orphanage

    Photo

    Thomas (left), 6 months after liberation, with a soldier who realized that Thomas was Jewish and took him to an orphanage, ca. 1945. Thomas was eventually reunited with his mother. With the end of World War II and collapse of the Nazi regime, survivors of the Holocaust faced the daunting task of rebuilding their lives. With little in the way of financial resources and few, if any, surviving family members, most eventually emigrated from Europe to start their lives again. Between 1945 and 1952, more than…

    Thomas Buergenthal with the soldier who realized that Thomas was Jewish and took him to an orphanage
  • A group of Tunisian schoolgirls

    Photo

    A group of Tunisian schoolgirls wearing aprons. Nadia Cohen is in the first row, third from the left. Tunis, Tunisia, ca. 1930-1935. Nadia Cohen was born on January 17, 1924, in Tunis. Nadia's parents came from Orthodox households, but her father left the yeshiva at the age of seven to study Italian, Arabic, and accounting in a French school. In 1938, Nadia was sent to a boarding school in France. She returned home for a visit in the summer of 1939 but could not return to school that fall due to the…

    A group of Tunisian schoolgirls
  • Elizabeth Kaufmann Koenig describes helping refugee children in Le Chambon

    Oral History

    Elizabeth and her family were in Paris when war began. As the Germans advanced in 1940, she and her mother fled southward. Elizabeth eventually reached Le Chambon, where she helped care for children sheltered by the town's pastor, Andre Trocme, and his wife. In late 1941 her father was among 1,000 intellectuals who received special US visas from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The family escaped from France in 1942 on one of the last passenger ships to cross the Atlantic during the war.

    Elizabeth Kaufmann Koenig describes helping refugee children in Le Chambon
  • The Holocaust

    Animated Map

    View an animated map showing key events of the Holocaust, the persecution and murder of 6 million Jews by the Nazi regime and its allies and collaborators.

    The Holocaust

Thank you for supporting our work

We would like to thank Crown Family Philanthropies and the Abe and Ida Cooper Foundation for supporting the ongoing work to create content and resources for the Holocaust Encyclopedia. View the list of all donors.