Search Results

Displaying results 51-60 of 311 for "world war I"

  • Article

    The 29th Infantry Division

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 29th Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • Article

    Erich Maria Remarque

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Erich Maria Remarque.

  • Rosa Luxemburg
    Article

    Rosa Luxemburg

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Rosa Luxemburg.

  • Georg Grosz
    Article

    Georg Grosz

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Georg Grosz.

  • Fascism
    Article

    Fascism

    Fascism is a far-right political philosophy, or theory of government, that emerged in the early twentieth century. Fascism prioritizes the nation over the individual, who exists to serve the nation. While fascist movements could be found in almost every country following World War I, fascism was most successful in Italy and Germany.

  • Sighet
    Article

    Sighet

    Sighet (known today as Sighetu Marmatiei), a town in Transylvania, was part of Romania following World War I. The town was part of Hungary between 1940 and 1944. Sighet is well known as the birthplace of Elie Wiesel (1928-2016) noted Holocaust survivor and author of Night. Wiesel, his family, and the rest of the Jews of Sighet were deported from the town to Auschwitz in May 1944.

  • Walther Rathenau
    Article

    Walther Rathenau

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Walther Rathenau.

  • Article

    The 1st Infantry Division

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 1st Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • Article

    The 26th Infantry Division

    In 1985, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the US Army's Center of Military History began a program to honor US Army divisions that took part in the liberation of Nazi camps. To date, 36 divisions, including the 26th Infantry Division, have been recognized as liberating units.

  • Article

    The 36th Infantry Division

    As Allied troops fought their way toward Berlin, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners. Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. Soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief. In addition to burying the dead, Allied forces attempted to help and comfort survivors with food, clothing, and medical assistance. Among the liberating units was the 36th Infantry. 

Thank you for supporting our work

We would like to thank The Crown and Goodman Family and the Abe and Ida Cooper Foundation for supporting the ongoing work to create content and resources for the Holocaust Encyclopedia. View the list of all donors.