Members of the medical detachment of Combat Command A, 12th Armored Division, XXI Corps, US 7th Army, view the burned corpses of victims at Kaufering IV.

The 12th Armored Division

As Allied troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they found tens of thousands of concentration camp prisoners in deplorable conditions.e Malnutrition and disease were rampant, and corpses lay unburied. The soldiers reacted in shock and disbelief to the evidence of Nazi atrocities. In addition to burying the dead, the Allied forces attempted to help and comfort the survivors with food, clothing and medical assistance.

Campaigns

Some five months after the D-Day invasion of western Europe by Allied forces, the 12th Armored Division entered France through the port of Le Havre and quickly made its way eastward toward Alsace by early December. In March 1945, the "Hellcats" advanced into the Rhineland and captured the city of Ludwigshafen on March 21. Deploying southward, the unit took the city of Würzburg early the next month. By the end of April, the 12th had advanced well into Bavaria and had reached the Danube River. The division ended the war in Austria.

During its penetration of southern Germany, the 12th overran one of the many subcamps of Dachau in the Landsberg area on April 27, 1945.

Members of the 12th Armored Division, which included African American platoons, await their orders.

Recognition

The 12th Armored Division was recognized as a liberating unit by the US Army's Center of Military History and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in 1988.

Casualty Figures

Casualty figures for the 12th Armored Division, European theater of operations:

  • Total battle casualties: 3,527
  • Total deaths in battle: 732

Division Nickname

"Hellcats," the winning entry in a division contest for a nickname held in early in 1943, symbolized the 12th's toughness and readiness for combat.

Insignia of the 12th Armored Division