<p>The <a href="/narrative/9934/en">accused</a> and their defense attorneys in the courtroom during the <a href="/narrative/9366/en">International Military Tribunal</a>. Nuremberg, Germany. </p>

Walther Funk

In the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, the world was faced with a challenge—how to hold individually accountable those German leaders who were responsible for the commission of monstrous crimes against humanity and international peace. The International Military Tribunal (IMT) held in Nuremberg, Germany, attempted to face this immense challenge. On October 18, 1945, the chief prosecutors of the IMT brought charges against 24 leading German officials, among them Walther Funk.

Walther Funk (1890–1960) was Minister of Economics and President of the Reichsbank (national bank) in Germany.  Funk participated in efforts to drive German Jews from the economy and played a major role in recycling confiscated property, valuables, and financial assets of Holocaust victims into the German war economy.

Found guilty on counts two, three, and four (crimes against peace, war crimes, and crimes against humanity), Funk was sentenced to life imprisonment. He was released in 1957 due to poor health.

Defendant Walther Funk,  former Nazi Minister of Economics and President of the Reichsbank (national bank).

Defendant Walther Funk, former Nazi Minister of Economics and President of the Reichsbank (national bank). - Harry S. Truman Library