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Displaying results 81-90 of 10 for "armenian genocide"

  • Düppel Center Displaced Persons Camp
    Article

    Düppel Center Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Düppel Center.

  • Article

    Ebensee Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Ebensee.

  • Documenting Liberation: Arnold E. Samuelson
    Article

    Documenting Liberation: Arnold E. Samuelson

    Arnold E. Samuelson was among the first Allied photographers in the Army Signal Corps. During his time in Europe, he documented Allied military campaigns in France and Belgium. He took some of the best known photographs of Holocaust survivors upon the liberation of the camps.

  • Documenting Liberation: J Malan Heslop
    Article

    Documenting Liberation: J Malan Heslop

    J Malan Heslop was among the first Allied photographers in the Army Signal Corps to document evidence of Nazi crimes. Along with Arnold E. Samuelson, he captured the plight of surviving prisoners at Ebensee, a subcamp of the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria.

  • Excerpts from the President's Commission Report
    Article

    Excerpts from the President's Commission Report

    On November 1, 1978, President Jimmy Carter established the President's Commission on the Holocaust and charged it with the responsibility to submit a report "with respect to the establishment and maintenance of an appropriate memorial to those who perished in the Holocaust."

  • Lampertheim Displaced Persons Camp
    Article

    Lampertheim Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Lampertheim. 

  • Article

    Law against the Founding of New Parties

    The Law against the Founding of New Parties was one of a series of key decrees, legislative acts, and case law in the gradual process by which the Nazi leadership moved Germany from a democracy to a dictatorship.

  • Tricase Displaced Persons Camp
    Article

    Tricase Displaced Persons Camp

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Tricase.

  • Germany: Jewish Population in 1933
    Article
  • Hans Fritzsche
    Article

    Hans Fritzsche

    In the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, the world was faced with a challenge—how to hold individually accountable those German leaders who were responsible for the commission of monstrous crimes against humanity and international peace. The International Military Tribunal (IMT) held in Nuremberg, Germany, attempted to face this immense challenge. On October 18, 1945, the chief prosecutors of the IMT brought charges against 24 leading German officials, among them Hans Fritzsche.

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