• Assembly point in the Warsaw ghetto

    Photo

    An assembly point (the Umschlagplatz) in the Warsaw ghetto for Jews rounded up for deportation. Warsaw, Poland, 1942–43.

    Assembly point in the Warsaw ghetto
  • Helena Husserlova with her daughter, Zdenka

    Photo

    In this portrait, Helena Husserlova, wearing a Jewish badge, poses with her daughter Zdenka who is holding a teddy bear. The photograph was taken shortly before they were deported to Theresienstadt.

    Zdenka was born in Prague on February 6, 1939. On October 10, 1941, when Zdenka was just two and a half years old, her father was deported to the Lodz ghetto. He died there almost a year later, on September 23, 1942. Following his deportation, Helena and Zdenka returned to Helena's hometown to live with her mother and uncle. They stayed there for a year before they were deported to Theresienstadt on November 16, 1942. Helena was subsequently deported to Auschwitz on October 19, 1944, where she died at the age of 34. Zdenka remained in Theresienstadt until the liberation. After the war Zdenka was placed on a transport of 300 child survivors to England sponsored by the British philanthropist, Leonard Montefiore.

     

    Helena Husserlova with her daughter, Zdenka
  • Members of the Danishevska family

    Photo

    Prewar family portrait of members of the Danishevska family in Vilna, Lithuania, 1926–27. None of those pictured here survived the Holocaust. 

    Tags: Lithuania
    Members of the Danishevska family
  • Klara Taussig and Ernst Brecher on an outing in the Austrian countryside

    Photo

    Klara Taussig and Ernst Brecher go on an outing in the Austrian countryside before their marriage. They later had a son, Heinz, who was born on August 29, 1932 in Graz, Austria. where his father was a merchant. After the Germans annexed Austria in 1938, Klara and Ernst sent Heinz to live with friends of an aunt in Zagreb.

    Heinz survived and eventually came to the United States on the Henry Gibbins, a military troop transport. Klara and Ernst died in the concentration camps. 

    Photograph taken in Austria, 1930–32. 

    Tags: Austria
    Klara Taussig and Ernst Brecher on an outing in the Austrian countryside
  • Frank Liebermann has a conversation with his teddy bear

    Photo

    Holocaust survivor Frank Liebermann has a conversation with his teddy bear. Germany, 1933–35.

    On Frank Liebermann’s first day of school in Gleiwitz, Germany, in 1935, he reported to one of the few small classrooms set aside for Jews. After school, he rushed home to avoid antisemitic attacks.

    In 1936, it got worse. Anti-Jewish laws now banned Frank from playgrounds and swimming pools.

    The family decided it was time to leave and applied for US visas. They were lucky. In October 1938, the Liebermanns boarded a ship bound for the United States.

    Frank Liebermann has a conversation with his teddy bear
  • Villiam Krausz sits with a doll and a teddy bear shortly before the family went into hiding

    Photo

    Benjamin Kedar (born Villiam Krausz) sits with a doll and a teddy bear shortly before his family went into hiding.

    Villiam's parents married in Prague and settled in Nitra, Slovakia. They worked as physicians. They had a daughter, Helen, in 1934, and Villiam in 1938. In 1942 the family relocated to a nearby village until September 1944. At that point, they went into hiding with Slovak peasants to avoid deportation to Auschwitz.

    Villiam, his sister, and his parents survived the Holocaust. Other relatives were murdered: his grandfather died in Thersienstadt and his aunt in Auschwitz. 

    Villiam Krausz sits with a doll and a teddy bear shortly before the family went into hiding
  • Photograph of Robert Coopman

    Photo

    Robert Coopman was born in the Netherlands in September 1940.  This 1941 photograph shows Robert holding a telephone while sitting next to a teddy bear. He and his parents lived in Amsterdam where his father was a salesman and bookkeeper. 

    In July 1942, fearing for their safety, Robert's parents placed him in hiding with the Viejou family in Naarden.  He was less than two years old. He lived as a member of the household until August 1944, when a neighbor betrayed them.

    Robert was  eventually deported to Theresienstadt.  His parents were deported to Sobibor

    Although malnourished and ill, Robert survived Theresienstadt. The Viejous eventually found Robert and after he had recuperated, he returned to live with his rescuer family until he was 18 years old. 

     

    Photograph of Robert Coopman
  • Trench warfare on the western front during World War I

    Photo

    Trench warfare is one of the iconic symbols of World War I. This photograph shows British troops carrying boards over a support line trench at night during fighting on the western front. Cambrai, France, January 12, 1917.

    Tags: World War I
    Trench warfare on the western front during World War I
  • Herta Oberheuser

    Photo

    Herta Oberheuser was a physician at the Ravensbrück concentration camp. She performed medical experiments. She was found guilty of performing sulfanilamide experiments, bone, muscle, and nerve regeneration and bone transplantation experiments on humans, as well as of sterilizing prisoners. 

    This portrait of Herta Oberheuser was taken when she was a defendant in the Medical Case Trial at Nuremberg.

    Herta Oberheuser
  • Honoring Oskar Schindler

    Photo

    Oskar Schindler plants a tree on the Avenue of the Righteous Among the Nations at Yad Vashem. The Righteous Among the Nations are non-Jewish invididuals who have been honored by Yad Vashem, Israel's Holocaust memorial, for risking their lives to aid Jews during the Holocaust.

    Honoring Oskar Schindler

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