<p>A transport of Jewish prisoners forced to march through the snow from the Bauschovitz train station to <a href="/narrative/5386">Theresienstadt</a>. Czechoslovakia, 1942.</p>

Artifact

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  • Washington Post article

    Artifact

    An August 6, 1972, Washington Post article about former concentration camp guard Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan, entitled "From a Dark Past, A Ghost the U.S. Won't Allow to Rest".

    Washington Post article
  • We Will Never Die, program cover, 1943

    Artifact

    The program cover for "We Will Never Die" featured Arthur Szyk’s "Tears of Rage" artwork. The cover's original dimensions are: 12 1/16" x 9 1/16" x 3/16.

    We Will Never Die, program cover, 1943
  • Wedding Dress

    Artifact

    This wedding dress was made from a parachute and worn by Lilly Lax for her wedding to Ludwig Friedman in a displaced persons camp. Ludwig had promised to find fabric for a white gown, and purchased an old parachute for this purpose. Lilly hired a seamstress to make the dress in exchange for her cigarette ration. Other brides in the Celle and Belsen displaced persons camps subsequently wore the dress. Lilly and Ludwig immigrated to the United States in 1948.

    Wedding Dress
  • "What shall be done with the war criminals?"

    Artifact

    Cover of booklet titled "What Shall Be Done with the War Criminals?" Published by the United States Armed Forces Institute, this was one of a series of 42 pamphlets created by the U.S. War Department under the series title "G.I. Roundtable." From 1943-1945, these pamphlets were created to "increase the effectiveness of the soldiers and officers and fighters during the war and as citizens after the war." Many of the pamphlets addressed the possibilities of a postwar world.

    "What shall be done with the war criminals?"
  • White armband with blue Star of David

    Artifact

    White armband with a Star of David embroidered in blue thread, worn by Dina Offman from 1939 until 1941 while in the ghetto in Stopnica, Poland.

    White armband with blue Star of David
  • White armband with blue Star of David

    Artifact

    White armband with a Star of David embroidered in blue thread, worn by Dina Offman from 1939 until 1941 while in the ghetto in Stopnica, Poland.

    White armband with blue Star of David
  • Woodblock print

    Artifact

    David Bloch, untitled woodblock print with watercolor, ca. 1945. Bloch, a German Jewish refugee, depicted typical shops in "Little Vienna," as Chusan Road in Hongkew became known. [From the USHMM special exhibition Flight and Rescue.]

    Woodblock print
  • Wool Bedcover

    Artifact

    Following the Soviet occupation of Lithuania, the Lifszyc family began to search for ways to leave the country. David Lifszyc obtained a Curacao visa from the Dutch consulate. He also obtained an American visa because he was included on a list of distinguished rabbis submitted to the State Department by the Agudat Israel of America. After obtaining Soviet exit visas, the Lifszycs purchased tickets for Vladivostok on February 5, 1941. They started for Moscow, where they received Japanese transit visas. This…

    Wool Bedcover

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