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| Displaying results 101-125 of 191 for "Film" |

  • Liberation of Bergen-Belsen

    Film

    After British soldiers liberated the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany, they forced the remaining SS guards to help bury the dead. Here, survivors of the camp taunt their former tormentors, who prepare to bury victims in a mass grave.

    Liberation of Bergen-Belsen
  • Liberation of Buchenwald

    Film

    The US army filmed the weak and emaciated survivors of the Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany to document Nazi crimes against humanity. This film was shot shortly after the liberation of the camp in April 1945.

    Liberation of Buchenwald
  • Liberation of Dachau

    Film

    The Dachau concentration camp, northwest of Munich, Germany, was the first regular concentration camp the Nazis established in 1933. About twelve years later, on April 29, 1945, US armed forces liberated the camp. There were about 30,000 starving prisoners in the camp at the time. Here, soldiers of the US Seventh Army document conditions in the camp. They also require German civilians to tour the camp and confront Nazi atrocities.

    Liberation of Dachau
  • Liberation of Dora-Mittelbau

    Film

    US forces liberated the Dora-Mittelbau (Nordhausen) concentration camp in April 1945. Here, medics and soldiers of the US 3rd Armored Division evacuate sick and dying survivors of the camp.

    Liberation of Dora-Mittelbau
  • Liberation of Ebensee camp

    Film

    US forces under the command of General Omar Bradley reached the Ebensee forced-labor camp in Austria in early May 1945. The Germans had built Ebensee at the foot of the Austrian Alps as part of the Mauthausen system of camps. The Nazis employed Ebensee prisoners as forced laborers during the construction of an underground rocket factory. Thousands died from the harsh conditions and back-breaking labor.

    Liberation of Ebensee camp
  • Liberation of Majdanek

    Film

    In July 1944, Soviet forces liberated the Majdanek extermination camp. The Polish-Soviet Nazi Crimes Investigation Commission, established to document Nazi atrocities committed during the German occupation of Poland, ordered exhumations at Majdanek as part of its efforts to investigate Nazi mass killings in the camp. The commission later published its findings in Moscow on September 16, 1944, in Polish, Russian, English, and French.

    Liberation of Majdanek
  • Liberation of Mauthausen

    Film

    The Mauthausen concentration camp was established shortly after the German annexation of Austria (1938). Prisoners in the camp were forced to perform crushing labor in a nearby stone quarry and, later, to construct subterranean tunnels for rocket assembly factories. US forces liberated the camp in May 1945. In this footage, starving survivors of the Mauthausen concentration camp eat soup and scramble for potatoes.

    Liberation of Mauthausen
  • Liberation of Mauthausen and Gusen

    Film

    This film footage is excerpted from documentary film titled "Mauthausen Concentration Camp," showing footage from both Mauthausen and the nearby Gusen camp. Filmed by US cameramen, the footage opens with a broad view of buildings in the Gusen camp. Excerpts that follow show scenes in the camps, American care of the liberated prisoners, and Austrian civilians loading bodies of victims onto carts for burial.

    Liberation of Mauthausen and Gusen
  • Liberation of Ohrdruf

    Film

    General Dwight D. Eisenhower and other American officers inspect conditions in the Ohrdruf concentration camp shortly after the liberation of the camp. As American forces had approached, SS camp guards shot the remaining prisoners before abandoning the camp. Confirmation of such atrocities prompted the US military to require Nazis and local German civilians to view the camps.

    Liberation of Ohrdruf
  • Liberation of Rome

    Film

    After Italy's armistice with the Allies in September 1943, the Italian army disintegrated. The country was divided between German forces holding the northern and central regions (including Rome) and Allied forces in the south. After nine months of bitter combat, Allied forces—specifically the US Fifth Army—liberated Rome in June 1944. This footage shows scenes of celebration as troops move through Rome. It ends with a prayer by Pius XII (pope, 1939–1958).

    Liberation of Rome
  • Liberation of Vilna

    Film

    In June 1944, the Soviet Union launched a massive offensive against the German army in eastern Europe. Soviet forces liberated Vilna in July 1944, after bitter street fighting with the German garrison. They then continued on toward Kovno, the capital of Lithuania. This Soviet footage depicts the battle for Vilna and the final liberation of the city by the Soviet army.

    Liberation of Vilna
  • Lodz ghetto

    Film

    The German army occupied Lodz, Poland, in September 1939. From early February 1940, Jews in Lodz were forced to move to a designated ghetto area, which was sealed on April 30, 1940. This German footage illustrates conditions during winter in the Lodz ghetto. Winter in the ghettos aggravated existing hardships, depleting already sparse supplies of food and fuel.

    Lodz ghetto
  • Medical Case: US prosecutor details illegal experiments

    Film

    The Medical Case was one of 12 war crimes trials held before an American tribunal as part of the Subsequent Nuremberg Proceedings. The trial dealt with doctors and nurses who had participated in the killing of physically and mentally impaired Germans and who had performed medical experiments on people imprisoned in concentration camps. Here, chief prosecutor Brigadier General Telford Taylor reads into evidence a July 1942 report detailing Nazi high-altitude experiments and outlines the prosecution's goals…

    Medical Case: US prosecutor details illegal experiments
  • Memorial Pageant calls for the rescue of European Jewry

    Film

    After word reached America of the Nazi killing of European Jewry, pressure mounted on the Roosevelt administration to help European Jews. To spur action, playwright Ben Hecht prepared a memorial to the Jewish victims of Nazi persecution, "We Will Never Die." The pageant, sponsored by the Zionist Revisionist Bergson Group, was part of a mass demonstration at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Later seen in other US cities, the show was part of the Bergson Group's effort to pressure Washington to act…

    Memorial Pageant calls for the rescue of European Jewry
  • Moving into the Krakow ghetto

    Film

    The German army occupied Krakow, Poland, in September 1939. In March 1941, the Germans ordered the establishment of a ghetto in Krakow. In this footage, Polish Jews are forced to move into the Krakow ghetto. They wear the required armbands, used to distinguish the Jewish population from the rest of the city's residents. By late 1941, there were some 18,000 Jews imprisoned in the Krakow ghetto.

    Tags: ghettos
    Moving into the Krakow ghetto
  • Mussolini meets with Hitler in Germany

    Film

    In 1936, Germany and Italy signed a military alliance. The two powers formed the so-called Berlin-Rome Axis. This footage shows Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini's state visit to Germany in September 1937. He met with Hitler in Munich and the two leaders also toured other parts of Germany. During the state visit, Mussolini attended a military parade in Berlin, Germany's capital. Although both dictators declared their desire for peace, Germany would begin World War II in 1939. Italy would then enter…

    Mussolini meets with Hitler in Germany
  • Nazi anti-Jewish boycott

    Film

    Soon after the Nazis assumed power in Germany, they launched a campaign to deprive Jews of their place in society. The effort began with an organized boycott of Jewish-owned businesses. Gangs arrested Jews, painted "Jews forbidden" onto shop windows, chanted antisemitic slogans, and blocked store entrances.

    Nazi anti-Jewish boycott
  • Nazi atrocities discovered upon the liberation of Buchenwald

    Film

    US forces liberated the Buchenwald concentration camp on April 11, 1945. This footage records examples of Nazi atrocities (shrunken head, pieces of tattooed human skin, preserved skull and organs) discovered by the liberating troops.

    Nazi atrocities discovered upon the liberation of Buchenwald
  • Nazi Party rally in Nuremberg

    Film

    In the 1920s and 1930s, the German city of Nuremberg was host to massive and lavish rallies for the Nazi Party. This film footage, produced by Julien Bryan in 1937, shows saluting crowds in the Nuremberg stadium watching groups parade past Adolf Hitler.

    Nazi Party rally in Nuremberg
  • Nazi tribute to German industrialist Gustav Krupp

    Film

    Hitler congratulates industrialist Gustav Krupp after presenting him with a Nazi party honor. After the ceremony, they toured a Krupp factory. This footage comes from the film "The Nazi Plan," produced and used by the United States in the prosecution at the Nuremberg trials.

    Nazi tribute to German industrialist Gustav Krupp
  • Nordhausen concentration camp

    Film

    Clip from George Stevens' "The Nazi Concentration Camps." This German film footage was compiled as evidence and used by the prosecution at the Nuremberg trials.

    Nordhausen concentration camp
  • Norwegian fascists

    Film

    This German newsreel footage shows Vidkun Quisling, leader of the fascist Norwegian Nasjonal Samling party, reviewing his troops. Quisling headed a pro-Nazi puppet regime in Norway during the war.

    Norwegian fascists
  • "Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today"

    Film

    This footage comes from "Nuremberg, Its Lesson for Today" a 1947 documentary film produced by the US military's Documentary Film Unit, Information Services Division. The film, directed by Pare Lorentz and Stuart Schulberg, shows footage from the trial of Nazi war criminals by the International Military Tribunal. It also intermixes historical footage depicting the founding of the Nazi state, the unleashing of World War II, and Nazi crimes against humanity. The sentencing sequence shown here illustrates the…

    "Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today"
  • Nuremberg Laws proclaimed

    Film

    Hermann Göring recites the preamble to the Nuremberg Laws at the seventh Nazi Party Congress. The laws would define German citizenship by blood and forbade marriages between Germans and Jews. A special session of the Reichstag (German parliament) enacted the laws, marking an intensification of Nazi measures against Jews.

    Nuremberg Laws proclaimed
  • Nuremberg Trial: Göring testifies

    Film

    Hermann Göring was head of the German air force. He was one of 22 major war criminals tried by the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. Here, Göring testifies about his order of July 31, 1941, authorizing Reinhard Heydrich, head of the Reich Security Main Office, to plan a so-called "solution to the Jewish question in Europe." The Tribunal found Göring guilty on all counts and sentenced him to death. Göring committed suicide shortly before his execution was to take place.

    Nuremberg Trial: Göring testifies

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