Filter by title:

| Displaying results 976-998 of 1025 for "Article" |

  • Walther Rathenau

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Walther Rathenau.

    Walther Rathenau
  • Wannsee Conference and the "Final Solution"

    Article

    On January 20, 1942, 15 high-ranking Nazi Party and German government officials gathered at a villa in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee to discuss and coordinate the implementation of what they called the "Final Solution of the Jewish Question."

    Wannsee Conference and the "Final Solution"
  • Wannsee Protocol

    Article

    The Wannsee Protocol is one of the most important surviving German documents on the Holocaust.

    Wannsee Protocol
  • Postwar Trials

    Article

    After World War II, international, domestic, and military courts conducted trials of tens of thousands of accused war criminals. Efforts to bring to justice to the perpetrators of Nazi-era crimes continue well into the 21st century. Unfortunately, most perpetrators have never been tried or punished. Nevertheless, the postwar trials did set important legal precedents. Today, international and domestic tribunals seek to uphold the principle that those who commit wartime atrocities should be brought to justice.

    Postwar Trials
  • War Refugee Board: Activities

    Article

    On January 22, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced a new policy to rescue and provide relief for Jews and other groups persecuted by Nazi Germany and its collaborators. The War Refugee Board, tasked with carrying out these programs, likely saved tens of thousands of lives.

  • War Refugee Board: Background and Establishment

    Article

    On January 22, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced a new policy to rescue and provide relief for Jews and other groups persecuted by Nazi Germany and its collaborators. The War Refugee Board, tasked with carrying out these programs, likely saved tens of thousands of lives.

  • Warsaw

    Article

    In the fall of 1940, German authorities established a ghetto in Warsaw, Poland’s largest city with the largest Jewish population. Almost 30 percent of Warsaw’s population was packed into 2.4 percent of the city's area.

    Tags: ghettos
    Warsaw
  • Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

    Article

    On April 19, 1943, the Warsaw ghetto uprising began after German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. Jewish insurgents inside the ghetto resisted these efforts. This was the largest uprising by Jews during World War and the first significant urban revolt against German occupation in Europe. By May 16, 1943, the Germans had crushed the uprising and deported surviving ghetto residents to concentration camps and killing centers.

    Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
  • Warsaw Uprising

    Article

    On August 1, 1944, the Polish Home Army (Armia Krajowa, AK), a non-Communist underground resistance movement, initiated the Warsaw uprising to liberate the city from the German occupation and reclaim Polish independence. The impetus for the military action was the ongoing retreat of the German forces from Poland, followed by the appearance of the Soviet Red Army along the east bank of the Vistula River. By October 2, 1944, the Germans had suppressed the uprising, deporting civilians to concentration and forced-labor camps and reducing Warsaw to ruins.

    Warsaw Uprising
  • Wartime Fate of the Passengers of the St. Louis

    Article

    After the denial of safe haven in Cuba and neglected appeals for entrance into the United States, the passengers of the St. Louis disembarked in Great Britain, France, Belgium, or the Netherlands. Their fate of the passengers in each depended on many factors subsequently, including geography and the course  of the war against Germany.

    Tags: St. Louis
    Wartime Fate of the Passengers of the St. Louis
  • Werner Hegemann

    Article

    In 1933, Nazi students at more than 30 German universities pillaged libraries in search of books they considered to be "un-German." Among the literary and political writings they threw into the flames were the works of Werner Hegemann.

  • Westerbork

    Article

    Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its allies established more than 44,000 camps and other incarceration sites (including ghettos). The perpetrators used these locations for a range of purposes, including forced labor, detention of people deemed to be "enemies of the state," and mass murder. Millions of people suffered and died or were killed. Among these sites was the Westerbork transit camp in the Netherlands.

    Westerbork
  • Western Desert Campaign: Egypt and Libya
  • Wetzlar Displaced Persons Camp

    Article

    For the Jews who survived the Holocaust, the end of World War II brought new challenges. Many could not or would not return to their former homelands, and options for legal immigration were limited. In spite of these difficulties, these Jewish survivors sought to rebuild their shattered lives by creating flourishing communities in displaced persons camps in Germany, Austria, and Italy. In an unparalleled six-year period between 1945 and 1951, European Jewish life was reborn in camps such as Wetzlar. 

    Wetzlar Displaced Persons Camp
  • What is Genocide?
  • Who Tried the Case?
  • Who Was Put on Trial?

    Article

    A union leader. A police chief. A newspaper editor. These people were among the defendants charged with crimes in the aftermath of World War II.

    Who Was Put on Trial?
  • Who were the Victims?

    Article

    The Nazi regime persecuted different groups on ideological grounds. Jews were the primary targets for systematic persecution and mass murder by the Nazis and their collaborators. Nazi policies also led to the brutalization and persecution of millions of others. Nazi policies towards all the victim groups were brutal, but not identical.

    Who were the Victims?
  • Wilhelm Frick

    Article

    In the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, the world was faced with a challenge—how to hold individually accountable those German leaders who were responsible for the commission of monstrous crimes against humanity and international peace. The International Military Tribunal (IMT) held in Nuremberg, Germany, attempted to face this immense challenge. On October 18, 1945, the chief prosecutors of the IMT brought charges against 24 leading German officials, among them Wilhelm Frick.

    Wilhelm Frick
  • Wilhelm Keitel

    Article

    In the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, the world was faced with a challenge—how to hold individually accountable those German leaders who were responsible for the commission of monstrous crimes against humanity and international peace. The International Military Tribunal (IMT) held in Nuremberg, Germany, attempted to face this immense challenge. On October 18, 1945, the chief prosecutors of the IMT brought charges against 24 leading German officials, among them Wilhelm Keitel.

    Wilhelm Keitel
  • Wilhelm Keitel: Biography

    Article

    Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel served as commander of all German armed forces during World War II. He was fully subservient to Hitler and allowed the latter to control all military strategy. In addition, he signed a series of criminal orders. He was tried and convicted at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg for war crimes and crimes against humanity and sentenced to death.

    Wilhelm Keitel: Biography
  • William L. Shirer

    Article

    American journalist, foreign correspondent, author, and pioneer radio broadcaster William L. Shirer was one of the major observers and chroniclers of the Nazi regime.  

  • Witnessing History

Thank you for supporting our work

We would like to thank Crown Family Philanthropies and the Abe and Ida Cooper Foundation for supporting the ongoing work to create content and resources for the Holocaust Encyclopedia. View the list of all donors.